Go Paperless?

The message reaches our ears almost daily: Go paperless! Sign up for e-billing, save the environment , and blah blah blah… Honestly, while I love the idea of going paperless, I just know I’d be forgetting to pay 75% of my bills on time. The only reason I remember is because there they are, cluttering up my kitchen counter. I look at them every day until one day I snap, and in a mad cleaning frenzy, pay all the bills. Discreetly send me my bills via e-mail and they won’t get paid. Marking messages as “unread” doesn’t clutter up my kitchen counter.

 There are many cases, though, where I would wholeheartedly support going paperless:

”   CanadaPost-delivered high-gloss junk mail: Go paperless.

”    Offers to bundle my phone, internet and cable: Definitely go paperless.

”    Rate change notifications from my insurance company: Please go paperless.

I realize that by going paperless these companies will not get my attention. That’s the point.

 The last one in my list sounds like a perilous notice to ignore, but I disagree. To be accurate, it’s not really the notice I’m opposed to – it’s the ridiculously small amounts they change my rates by that irks me. Some clock-watcher at head office charges me a $0.75 service charge to raise my rates by $0.79, and then mails an 8.5 x 14 sheet of paper at a cost of $0.59 explaining everything in painful detail. Really?

 With all the cash this company is forcibly seizing from their cliens’ collective bank accounts, they cannot afford to absorb a $0.79 rate hike until December 31? It’s no wonder the company’s costs (and my premiums) are going up when it costs more for them to prepare and mail out a piece of correspondence than they stand to recover in premiums.

 As it is, it seems my insurance company is still stuck in the stone-age when it comes to effective use of resources – paper being one of them. For crying out loud, I’m kept busy trying to wade through the deluge of papers the school sends home; I don’t need this nonsense.

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